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Thread: What are your thoughts on male privilege?

  1. #26
    AKA Lexi sometimes_miss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stefan37 View Post
    If you were born male. You have experienced male privilege whether you are aware of it or not. You were given opportunities that would not have been available to a woman.
    OK. Someone is born female. She has the option of having children or not, and having someone else pay for it or not (pretty easy to arrange, if she's smart at all, really). Males do not have this option. Not to mention, that up until THIS war, we got drafted and women did not, another non-negotiable 'privilege' we had that women didn't.

    We can go on about this all day long. Each sex has it's inherent advantages and disadvantages.

    In my experience, it's more of a money privilege than anything else. I've discussed this over and over about being male (and I'm white) being somehow favored but I haven't experienced it in person. I think it's more women and racial minorities seeing selected things happen with white men and they automatically assume every guy gets the same treatment, sort of like as men we see beautiful women getting free drinks, dinners, multiple offers of dates every night of the week, and sex whenever they want and sort of think that all women get that. Men with money have options that neither women or men without money get.
    In contrast, there is no affirmative action for white men, anywhere. There are no quotas in the NBA, NFL, or nursing, or cosmetology programs, or teaching or working placement in any field where males are in very low numbers. Because 'some' males are favored, somewhere, all the rest of us have to put up with the backlash and not expect to complain.
    That said, it all comes down to the same old 'the grass is greener on the other side of the fence' viewpoint. There are advantages and disadvantages to each and every group. And it's up to the individual to understand that, and choose the path we want, and not b!tch and moan about how somebody else has what we want. Nobody gets everything they want. That's just how life works.
    As an example: 28 years ago, I switched careers. I was told by my immediate superior that my chances of promotion were nil. Because upper management was lilly white and male, so they wouldn't be advancing me no matter how good I was; my best bet was to look into another industry, because pretty much every company in that business was in the same predicament. I had worked hard for that job, and felt that even with little chance, surely it couldn't be true. Over the next few years I watched as they did indeed, promote female and minority coworkers instead of me despite my better performance, all in the name of so called equality as defined by the EEOC. So much for 'white privilege'. Knowing what I learned, I next went into a field where there were virtually no male workers, and base salary would be more than adequate with pay raises coming with experience, and promotions not necessary.
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  2. #27
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    Personally, I have had to struggle, fight and claw for every little thing I have ever had in my life. I was never given any special privileges of any kind, whether because of what is between my legs, or any other reason.

  3. #28
    MIDI warrior princess Amy Fakley's Avatar
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    I think it's interesting that the teaching and nursing professions are mentioned. Offhand I can't think of any other professions that both require (at least) a 4 year degree, but for which the pay (and respect) are on par with managing a burger king.

    Thats male privilege in a nutshell. If those were male dominated professions, that wouldn't stand. Of course there are men in those professions, and they're not benefitting from male privilege (on the whole)? That's how it works. It's not about an individual experience, it's about the larger picture.
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  4. #29
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    Well some of you sure are not getting it, its obvious you have never experienced being like some sort of second class citizen. What you call male privilege is called machism everywhere else that is not the US (which by the way some of you should also look outside the US, the world is not only the US, even if most of you here are from there).

    Machism and male privilege go hand in hand but can be understood differently, and while the terms are related, they are not exactly the same thing as they dont usually transmit the same meaning to most people, it seems, and some of your responses are a good example of this.

    You understand male privilege as if it was somekind of easier life circumstance where you get anything just because of your condition of male. Well, no, this is not the case, obviousbly its not what we are talking about here.

    Machism, which is a word that defines the issue much better, means basically that society is made for men to rule over women, and the more typical "macho" you are understood to be, the better it will go for you.

    Essentially, we are talking about patriarchy here, where men are supossed to be in charge of everything, be taken seriously and respected, and women are supossed to be on a second scene, being treated as less because of their condition of being female, and suppossed to be submissive to men.

    So no, it does not mean you don't have to work hard or put effort, it means that you, just because you are male, will always be granted a position above a female. That is machism, patriarchy, male privilege...

  5. #30
    Reality Check Krisi's Avatar
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    Male privilege?

    Are you talking about the male privilege where as a child you are expected to excel at sports while females sit and look pretty?
    Are you talking about the male privilege where you are expected to ask the female out on a date and pay for everything?
    Are you talking about the male privilege where (in my time) you could be drafted and sent to war and return in a box or with body parts missing?

    Perhaps you talking about the male privilege where you are expected to be the breadwinner of the family?
    Or are you talking about the male privilege where you are forced to pay alimony and child support and have them taken directly out of your paycheck before you even see it but still pay taxes on it?
    Are you talking about the male privilege where your ex wife and children remain in the home you are still paying for while you live in a one room efficiency apartment down by the railroad tracks?

    Or could it be the male privilege where your lifespan is ten years less than a female?

    All in all, the grass is the same degree of green on both sides of the fence. In some ways, the males may have it better, in other ways, the females have it better. In reality, all of us here are "privileged". World wide, the majority of folks are scrounging for food and shelter every day and don't have the time or resources to join and post on Internet forums.

  6. #31
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    I accidentally deleted my post on the phone app: for some reason the phone version of this is not working:

    I think some people are confused about what privilege is. There definitely is male privilege. But there are other types as well and some people here are confusing them.

    First the definition:
    "a right, immunity, or benefit enjoyed only by a person beyond the advantages of most"

    In our society there is systematic oppression, structurally in how our government is run that often still marginalizes other groups. In other countries it can be better or worse.

    There are different types of oppression, and privilege. I think its important for us as people on the Trans spectrum and those who are their allies, are really honest about privilege in all forms and what that means. I went to a conference and we talked about the violence against trans people. There is a reason why they most amount of people killed per year for hate crimes are, TRANS, WOMEN, of COLOR. Its the intersection of these oppression that suffer the most at the systematic oppression.

    Examples:

    Type of Oppression> Who feels it> who is "privileged" to not have that oppression

    Sexism> Oppressed are historically women> so privileged are men.
    Racism> People of Color > Whites
    Heterosexism> Lesbians, gays, bi> Hetrosexuals
    Gender> Cis gender> trans
    Nationalism> immigrant's> Natural citizens
    Religious hegemony > christian > non christian
    Socioeconomic> poor> rich
    Added*
    Elitism>uneducated>educated
    Able ism>disabled >non disabled
    Etc

    These things are important because its pointless to argue that male privilege doesn't exist, just because you are oppressed in another category. it doesn't really work that way. Luca and I talked about how him being born male, and how he was raised gave him many advantages as a male, that manifest as disadvantages when he portrays female.

    For example, women are taught from a young age, not to tease men with your outfits, how to dress to get a man, the traits that a husband wants. How not to be raped. How to not walk alone.

    Lucas was never taught these things. Many men were not. Why? Because they just haven't had to been taught that to the extent women have. The same is true for race, how people of color are conditioned to behave from a young age "don't touch anything they will think you stole it" is different than people who are white.

    This is something that is bigger than all of us. It's bigger than, well my life wasn't that way so it's not true.

    I really believe that we will never get anywhere in society until each and everyone of us, takes an honest look at our privilege and our oppression. Lacking in one area does not negate another. Owning this and moving forward is the way to progress. But as long as we have people who say that it doesn't exist, because of their life circumstances, who lack the ability to see the bigger picture, progress will stall.

    I do see where many of you feel you have not seen or had male privilege. Growing up the way many of you have, with a variance in your gender. I think its easy play a victim and say that because of the way you are, you have no male privilege, and say that I have had nothing.

    I could also do that, saying I grew up a poor girl. So privilege doesn't exist for me. But my world as a poor white, cis gendered girl, was a hell of a lot different than a poor black trans girl. But we are both women, and both poor?! Right? Our experiences must have been similar? Likening my life experience to hers, would be wrong! I didn't have any privilege she didn't? Right? We were both poor and women. So obviously racism doesn't exist. Sounds silly doesn't it? Yet, That's the types of comments I have been seeing here. And I hope that you read that and see how very some of you are. Its not about "Who has it better" its about who has an unfair advantage and who is disadvantaged due to the way they are BORN. And that is always wrong.

    And yes, we have made strides, women can vote, women can work. But systematically, there are many things that haven't changed. Here is a list from a website of 30 ways male privilege still exists: They also have a list on Heterosexual privilege, and did one a while ago on christian privilege, and cis gendered privilege. If many of us here can agree that there is Cis Gender or Hetero Privilege, I don't see why we are debating Male Privilege.
    Last edited by Greenie; 08-04-2015 at 01:55 PM. Reason: Stupid Phone.

  7. #32
    Member Abby Kae's Avatar
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    In my short time here on these forums, I've seen a couple posts about tips for feeling safe when dressing in public at night.

    If you've ever gone out at night, in drab, and never felt the need to worry about your safety, you've experienced first hand what male privilege is.

    If you've ever gone out at night, en femme, and made sure to travel with friends, in supportive neighborhoods, staying near street lights, you've experienced first hand the sudden lack of that male privilege.

    You can talk about affirmative action causing you to be overlooked for promotions, or how you're a nice guy who always finishes last, or how you got drafted into a war you didn't want to fight, and none of those feelings are invalid. But none of those things make up for the fact that you can go out at night, in drab, without fear of violence for what gender you are.

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    Krisi, all you are talking about is MACHISM, not privilege, thats why I am pointing out the two must be differentiated, even if they are related in some instances. Its a kind of machism that backfires many times on males. Its sexism if you want to call it that way, that puts pressure on people to meet certain stupid criteria.

    Thats why I'm stressing that if you want this to change, you should support feminism, and feminism does not mean to step over males, it means equality in every sense. Even if the word "feminism" sounds like stepping over males, it is not used to describe that, it is used to describe a movement of equality.

  9. #34
    Reality Check Krisi's Avatar
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    You can call it what you want, that doesn't change anything.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisi View Post
    You can call it what you want, that doesn't change anything.
    You don't get it, do you?

    You keep thinking the privilege we are talking about here means males are entitled to do everything, and females not. No... this is not what we are talking about here.

    Women experience machism everyday in their lifes, to how they are supossed to look, to what they are being paid, to how they are supossed to behave... and a long very long etcetera.

    Men experience machism everyday too, but since they are men, they are taken seriously, respected and being given higher standards on everything just because they are males.

    But of course as long as they meet what society demands a man to be. And here is where they experience machism / sexism aswell.

    You get the point now? You see why the term male privilege and machism / sexism are related but are not the same? You see why the term "privilege" is misleading here in some points?

  11. #36
    Reality Check Krisi's Avatar
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    Or is it you who doesn't get it?

    Just because you believe something doesn't make your opinion right and other opinions wrong (except in your own mind). As adults, we have to understand that not everyone agrees with us and that's OK.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisi View Post
    Or is it you who doesn't get it?

    Just because you believe something doesn't make your opinion right and other opinions wrong (except in your own mind). As adults, we have to understand that not everyone agrees with us and that's OK.
    I explained something. You didn't get it, in my opinion, so I explained again. So yes, we are both exercising what you just said. Am I wrong?
    Last edited by Ezekiel; 08-04-2015 at 10:05 AM.

  13. #38
    Member Abby Kae's Avatar
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    The existence of male privilege isn't an opinion. It's a fact.

    Krisi, you're allowed to not believe in it, just like you're allowed to believe the sun revolves around the earth. Your belief doesn't change anything.

  14. #39
    Reality Check Krisi's Avatar
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    Try reading my first post again with the thought of understanding it, not rebutting it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amy Fakley View Post
    I think it's interesting that the teaching and nursing professions are mentioned. Offhand I can't think of any other professions that both require (at least) a 4 year degree, but for which the pay (and respect) are on par with managing a burger king.

    Thats male privilege in a nutshell. .

    Indeed. Excellent point, but there is a certain segment of the population that is unable to think beyond their own limited experience.

    You can't argue with those people.
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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisi View Post
    Try reading my first post again with the thought of understanding it, not rebutting it.
    Krisi, I've read your post #30.

    1. Not all boys play sports. Also, a lot of girls play sports. 50% of all students (male and female) do not play sports in high school.
    2. It's true that men have traditionally been the ones to ask women out. When I was a young, we were taught that men were turned off by women who chased them. But all of this is changing. Also, in today's relationships women do contribute financially to the costs of outings.
    3. Yes, men have gone to war. But women are now fighting to be allowed to join the military in the same capacity as men. Also, throughout history the women in besieged countries have been raped by invading armies. There are no winners in war.
    4. In today's economy, most families are dual-income. Men are no longer the sole bread winners.
    5. In today's divorce laws, women also pay alimony if they earn more than their ex-husbands and if their husbands are awarded custody. And men are increasingly being awarded custody.
    6. See above.
    7. Lifespan: I'll give you that one.


    To be fair, women have privilege too. Here's a list. I can debate about half the items on the list that seem a stretch (for example makeup and appearance 8, 9, spending 15, household contributions 20, 21, work expectations 26, 27, career options 29, crime 30, all divorce laws 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, and rape 43, 44, 45, 46, 47) but some of the items on the list have merit.

    List of Female Privilege
    (be selective with the reading)


    All in all, I think Greenie has the most objective post in this thread.
    Reine

  17. #42
    Member jasminepp's Avatar
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    I agree ReineD, during wars when men were drafted there were many women who would have volunteered for military service but because of male priveledge/sexism etc they were not allowed that choice or oppertunity to serve thier country. And sure boys may often be expected to excell in sports but girls often had a hard time even being allowed to play sports at all, let alone with the boys. Still to this day no matter how great a basketball player a woman is she still is not allowed to play in the NBA as an equal to men, she must play in a less popular womans league which gives nowhere near the advantages of being an NBA superstar, same goes for most other leagues. Also, men usually providing financially on dates comes from a time when most women were confined to working in the house and had an extremely hard time trying to gain outside work, career etc and so they didn't often have thier own personal finances for dates or anything else for that matter. We may be making much progress in the western world but ask saudi women if they're limited by male priveledge

  18. #43
    AKA Lexi sometimes_miss's Avatar
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    OK, I'll add a few more ideas for those of you who conveniently forget.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ezekiel View Post
    Well some of you sure are not getting it, its obvious you have never experienced being like some sort of second class citizen.
    I think most of us all grew up in a situation where as children, we were treated as second class citizens, unless of course you were one of the spoiled brats that threw tantrums and your parents gave you whatever you wanted to calm down; that's pretty much a new phenomenon. Used to be, shut up or get hit. How's that for being second class? Be quiet, do as you're told, no pay, you get only what they give you. Get up when you're told to, eat what's given or nothing at all, go to bed when told to, and don't make a sound; and DON'T, god forbid, wake up daddy because he'll beat you because he has to get up to work in the morning. Got to school every day to do stuff you hate all day long, and do whatever the teacher tells you and smile at her and be nice all the time or you'll be considered 'fresh' and the teacher will tell your parents and you get punished (If you didn't get hit, well that was a plus for you. We got strapped as punishment, which means, we learned early on to do whatever grown ups told us or we'd be very, very sorry). If you can't remember what it's like to be told what you can and cannot do with finality, well, I can't help you there. But anyone with a good memory will remember EXACTLY what it's like to have someone wielding power and control over every second of their life. Did I forget you weren't even allowed to LOOK at an adult sideways? Or dare mumble something that they even might consider a derogitory comment? You'd get a swat and literally have your mouth washed out with soap; normally, ivory soap. If you cursed, it was Lava or brown soap, and you weren't allowed to spit it out for what seemed like hours even though it was only seconds.
    People like to look back on childhood as a much simpler fun time of life. Nope. We just blank out the bad stuff. If you were lucky enough to be in the older group of children, you wielded power of your own over the younger kids. If you were one of the younger kids, you were, for all intents and purposes, screwed.
    it means that you, just because you are male, will always be granted a position above a female.
    I work with all women, who have seniority over me, and as the managers are also women, believe me, being male is of no advantage. So no, I haven't experienced that at all. You live in a bubble. might be way bigger than mine, but it's still a bubble, for what you see is not the universal experience. And just because MINE is different than most, does not mean that there aren't a lot of other situations where women don't have an advantage, either.
    Quote Originally Posted by jasminepp View Post
    I agree ReineD, during wars when men were drafted there were many women who would have volunteered for military service but because of male priveledge/sexism etc they were not allowed that choice
    Lots of men volunteered as well; they were brainwashed into thinking the experience was going to be something it wasn't. Let's go kill the nazis, or commies. Things changed when they started shooting back. Nam brought with it horrific booby traps as well. War has been different for the past 50 years, there hasn't been a whole lot of being deployed into situations with a oh, 90% expected casualty rate. Where whole platoons got wiped out. Where every block in america had a house with a war widow's black ribbons hanging in the windows in it. War looks good until you're in it. Basic training tries to make you forget your basic instincts, so you'll willingly become cannon fodder should the need arise to sacrifice (to death) the first group of soldiers going in. And it works, to a degree. Today's army experience is different; I'm not saying it's easy, or simple. But comparatively they're well supplied by any comparison.
    Women would like to volunteer? Sure. As above, it isn't what it seems to be when you're not on the front lines. NOBODY born in America who is still alive, has had to defend their own territory from immediate invasion. Nobody. So they don't know what it's like. Talk to survivors of Korea and ask, there are still some Korean immigrants who served during that war who can tell you what it was like. Simply, women historically have never been on the front lines in any number. Why? Because it didn't make sense; women were needed to have babies and hence, more soldiers. Which would you choose to be: The one having the babies 4000 miles away in safety, or the first ones going into the beach on Normandy?
    While today's soldiers experience is way different, just look at what happens when they get killed; the public is up in arms about sending them into harms way, protesting that we shouldn't be sending them in to unsafe areas. But that's exactly where they're supposed to be, they just won't tell you that when you sign up. They currently hide the deaths away from the news so no one knows what's going on. Used to be we saw the body boxes getting unloaded on TV every night. No more. Don't want to scare away any recruits, now, do we. And it's working.
    Quote Originally Posted by ReineD View Post
    Also, in today's relationships women do contribute financially to the costs of outings.
    Not initially. If a guy expects to get a second date, he'd sure better be paying for that night the first time around, that's pretty much a given. Come on now, Reine.
    In today's economy, most families are dual-income. Men are no longer the sole bread winners.
    No, but we're still expected to be the PRIMARY bread winners. A man who stays at home while his wife works is pretty much reviled by everyone. And if he doesn't get a job of some kind, no one's surprised if she leaves him. NEVER works the other way around, NEVER, a woman can sponge off of a man for life and not a word is said, and it's still going on. The other women might say, 'well she certainly must be worth it' or some other baloney like that which of course implies the world's oldest profession (which is real, by the way, women still trade sex and the concept of getting sex to get a man to make a financial, i.e., marriage, commitment to her). Even when a woman stops having sex with him by choice, the guy is expected to financially support her for life. Never the other way around.
    In today's divorce laws, women also pay alimony if they earn more than their ex-husbands and if their husbands are awarded custody. And men are increasingly being awarded custody.
    Last I heard, that happens less than 10% of the time. How many men do you know that have sole custody? Any? How many women are currently in jail for not paying child support? How many have you ever even heard of? But it happens to men every day, all the time, especially since the last economic downturn. Men are expected to maintain an certain income, forever, and often has to fork it over until that kid gets out of college and has a job. If he can't, he goes to jail. Lost your good paying job due to the recession? Too bad. Go to jail. Do not pass go. Do not collect $200.
    Lifespan: I'll give you that one.
    Well, for a bit of levity, why do married men die before married women? Because they want to.
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    Why don't we understand our desire to dress, behave and feel like a girl? Because from childhood, boys are told that the worst possible thing we can be, is a sissy. This feeling is so ingrained into our psyche, that we will suppress any thoughts that connect us to being or wanting to be feminine, even to the point of creating separate personalities to assign those female feelings into.

  19. #44
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    It sounds like everyone generally experienced that equally which means that girls and minorities endured that right along with everyone else, plus had the above and beyond experience of discrimination/sexism etc that others didn't have to endure. I think thats the point. Most people go through hardships and have to work very hard to get where they are but there are certain categories of people who generally have many more obstacles that stand in thier way. Yes there are definately some that make it through and get to the top- women managers/CEOs, black president etc, but that doesn't discount the fact that statistics prove that certain groups of people inherently have the odds stacked against them.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisi View Post
    Male privilege?

    Are you talking about the male privilege where as a child you are expected to excel at sports while females sit and look pretty?
    Are you talking about the male privilege where you are expected to ask the female out on a date and pay for everything?
    Are you talking about the male privilege where (in my time) you could be drafted and sent to war and return in a box or with body parts missing?
    You can take the opposite and ask questions about women... The point I think is to look at the bigger picture. Everyone can make an argument against something in culture.

    I feel like what you are saying is: We have a black president so racism is over. Is the same to me as Men pay for dates so there is no male privilege.

    Some brief examples I can think of to the contrary, that have been notable recently:

    Women gamers are threatened that they will be raped and killed daily. Are male gamers?
    Women youtubers have people comment on their music videos that they should do kill them selves. That they should be raped and murdered. Are Male youtubers treated the same?
    Women have sex with multiple partners they are ****s and *****s, men do the same and they are given fist bumps and high fives.
    Men don't get harassed at work or told that they are distracting in the work place to the opposite sex. (Personal example. I was wearing slacks and a turtleneck and high heels.)
    Men don't get called things like "Hun, Babe, Sweet cakes, Little lady, Little girl, Etc At work" (Also a personal Experience)

    For all your examples of how male privilege doesn't exist, I can come up with hundreds for how it does. I think its time we knowledge that it does. And that female privilege also happens in instances related to child care, child custody battles, etc and that the world is never gong to be perfectly in the middle all the time. For every time you can think of example that women have the upper hand, the same can be done for men.

    I do agree that we are socioeconomically privileged to be sitting here on our smart phones and computers arguing about whether or not "privilege exists" and if its more skewed towards males and females.

    Each of us brings our own life experience to the table. So that makes it so that our opinions are naturally going to be different. Its meeting in the middle and discussing them in an educated and thought out manner that is what is needed for our society to move forwards.

    We all have our own biases. And I think its time we own that. As a female, my major oppression has been sexism. I have viewed it in a different way then you have, naturally. My lens is coated by the sexual harassment I receive daily while walking on the streets of Seattle. The fear that I have when needing to walk from the building to my car when its dark outside. The constant reminder in my head in the voice of my mother to "not get raped." Because being raped is still teh womans fault, instead of the fault of the rapist. When the first question people ask is, what was she wearing? If a man is raped, that question will never be asked.

    This is my world and these are my truths. Meanwhile your lens is how you have experienced the world as a Male? (I don't recall if you are CD or TG). And your examples must be rooted in experience. Dating, the war, sports. Etc. (Side note, women actually don't think its a privilege to be able to just "sit there and look pretty", we also want to be accepted for our skills and ability, to excel and be taken seriously, looks and beauty of often something women don't feel "privileged by) I am wondering if there is also an age gap between you and myself. That ideal of women is very much not true anymore for my generation.

    Can you acknowledge that my life experience, and those of many women, can lead to a world where many women see males as privilege? Because I can acknowledge that your life experience makes it so that you do not feel like male privilege exists.

    Bigger picture, when a collective body (women) feel that they are a marginalized minority, would it not make sense to look at the collective of those women s experiences and say, "You know what, this many people feel this way, whether I agree with the terminology or not, there has got to be something happening here?" If a bunch of people say X, Maybe X might be a possibility to consider"
    ~Greenie

    Supportive wife to a wonderful man who just so happens to like to be fabulous some times.

  21. #46
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    Honestly, I wonder if it is mostly males who fantasize about being women, that think they don't have male privilege?

    I bet if we asked men who've never had a thought about wearing women's things, looking like a woman, or adopting the weaker of womens' roles, they'd acknowledge the existence of male privilege?
    Reine

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    Litmus Test...

    I propose a small experiment...

    Guys, put these questions to adult women that you know:

    1. Does sexism exist? (Use SEXISM specifically and NOT Privilege)
    2. If #1 was yes, have you experienced this personally, witnessed a sexist act or both?
    3. If #1 was yes, how do you deal with it?
    4. If #2 was yes, describe the situation.


    Please post your findings here when you have them.

    Thanks,

    DeeAnn

  23. #48
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    Fresh off the press!

    Here's a bit of news to show that things are indeed becoming more equal!

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b0138b0bf44b98
    Reine

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReineD View Post
    Honestly, I wonder if it is mostly males who fantasize about being women, that think they don't have male privilege?

    I bet if we asked men who've never had a thought about wearing women's things, looking like a woman, or adopting the weaker of womens' roles, they'd acknowledge the existence of male privilege?
    Hi Reine,

    I would bet you are wrong. A predominant portion of men (macho/mucho Alpha types) I know would never admit to "male privilege". Oh I am sure they know it exists on some level but in their mind it does not. However, I have also met men who admit it does exist and take steps to help it disappear. But then again I am sure there are many here who also understand what male privilege is just as there are those who will never admit to it . . . we are after all still a representative portion of society with all our biases and judgments.

    I think what happens is that some cannot see the big picture and make it more personal . . . "I never got everything handed to me because I am a male and had to work darn hard" . . . on that I can agree. Yes, being born male has provided me with certain advantages which was not afforded to my female counterparts in the military . . . especially the combat arms profession . . . instant tactical credibility because I am a man comes to mind. Does that negate my own hard work in my career? No, however I would be narrow minded to not admit "male privilege" exists. It is not about me or what I have achieved, it is endemic to society and truth be told it needs to be stomped out by both genders.

    As a man, just sit back and observe a meeting or interaction in the work place. Yes, there are women who have risen to become "Alpha" and carry that well, just there are plenty of men who shrink to the back of the meeting room. However, statistically, it is still very much an Alpha male world (depending the on occupation). Again, don't misquote me . . . it is not about you. We all can get some rather crappy cards dealt to us in life which may make us think we personally have not benefited from privilege but if you think long an hard . . . it has happened. Does that mean you didn't work hard or suffered your share of indignities, strife or just all around crap? No, but again it is not about you, it is about society in general.

    Cheers

    Isha

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isha View Post
    Hi Reine,

    I would bet you are wrong. A predominant portion of men (macho/mucho Alpha types) I know would never admit to "male privilege". Oh I am sure they know it exists on some level but in their mind it does not. However, I have also met men who admit it does exist and take steps to help it disappear. But then again I am sure there are many here who also understand what male privilege is just as there are those who will never admit to it . . . we are after all still a representative portion of society with all our biases and judgments.
    This makes sense.


    On another tack, and somewhat related, on facebook tonight I was directed to a research site at Harvard that tests for prejudice or bias. There are a few tests that relate to gender. I thought you might be interested in this Isha (and anyone else). They're among the best online tests I've seen. They only take 10 minutes each, the method is objective, and they are careful to explain why the results might be skewed at the end of it. These are not the "fun" tests on popular media with predictable answers that tell people their gender. lol. And you can compare your results to a sizable cohort at the end.

    Have a go! The two gender tests relate to whether we associate the Liberal Arts or the Sciences predominately with men or women, and family or career lives with men or women. There are also tests on whether we have a bias for or against a particular religion, various races, sexual orientation, age, weight.

    https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/selectatest.html
    Last edited by ReineD; 08-05-2015 at 04:37 AM.
    Reine

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