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Thread: It's the Roaring 20's

  1. #1
    Member Denise C's Avatar
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    It's the Roaring 20's

    Hi all!

    Now that we are in the roaring 20's should be bring back the swingers/flapper dresses? It think its awesome to be in the 20's.

    What say you?


    Denise

  2. #2
    🌹💋🌹🌺💋🎀❤️🎀💋🌺🌹💋🌹 Patience's Avatar
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    While I wouldn't mind being back in my twenties, I'd rather not be back in the days of prohibition and segregation which eventually ended up in the great depression, thank you.

    The outfits of the well-heeled gentry were nice during that time I'll give you that.
    ...and though she feels as if she is in a play, she is anyway...

  3. #3
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    I understand the "Roaring 20's" was the theme at many parties this past New Years' Eve. I can see the theme having limited appeal outside of parties. One of the things to consider about the "Roaring 20's" is many women wrapped their breasts to minimize their "boobs." I cannot see myself going flat chested, i.e., no bra with enhancements.

  4. #4
    Reality Check Krisi's Avatar
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    Unless you're a lot older than you look, I suspect you don't remember the "roaring twenties" and only know what you've seen in movies or on TV or read in books. That's the glamorous part. Many Americans were not well off and were picking cotton or doing other physically taxing jobs. And of course racial segregation was the norm. You are just seeing the rich white folks and even that has been glamorized.
    Krisi

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    Senior Member Jean 103's Avatar
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    Last Saturday night at the bar two of my friends and I celebrated our birthdays. We we have done it before. Played pool, danced, and drank too much. No driving, I walked.

    I was the only one in a dress, normal. That is till three girls walked in wearing flapper dresses. Did I mention are was a DJ and we danced the night way, and the hangover was worth it.

  6. #6
    Member Denise C's Avatar
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    No not old enough to remember the 1920s. And do understand the disparities and much more the depression. Not looking forward to Prohibition (for anything for that matter).

    It was more the movie aspect and the flapper styles and fashion I was referring to and social aspect of those that could afford it at the time.

  7. #7
    Member Star01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denise C View Post
    No not old enough to remember the 1920s. And do understand the disparities and much more the depression. Not looking forward to Prohibition (for anything for that matter).

    It was more the movie aspect and the flapper styles and fashion I was referring to and social aspect of those that could afford it at the time.
    In spite of the times the 20's is often remembered for being socially and culturally dynamic and as a time that ushered in changes that had an impact on society. I can see what you meant and agree that was an interesting time. A lot of people point to the Victorian era for the decor and dress but no time in our history was entirely perfect. That can be said for today as well but doesn't mean that these aren't the good old days for somebody.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie47 View Post
    I understand the "Roaring 20's" was the theme at many parties this past New Years' Eve. I can see the theme having limited appeal outside of parties. One of the things to consider about the "Roaring 20's" is many women wrapped their breasts to minimize their "boobs." I cannot see myself going flat chested, i.e., no bra with enhancements.
    A small/flat chest and minimum hips were considered fashionable in the 1920s (as was shorter hair on women), in contrast to the Victorian Era.

  9. #9
    Member LydiaL's Avatar
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    Flappers were gals that felt liberated, were scandalous, and pushed against previous barriers. Too, they liked to show a lot of leg.

    Hmm, sounds kinda like us!

  10. #10
    Member Audrey34's Avatar
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    Women's hemlines began to rise around 1925. By 1927 most young "flappers" were wearing dresses at the knees. I actually have reproductions of Sears catalogs from the 20s. Very interesting stuff.

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    Senior Member Kay J's Avatar
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    What bare legs no thanks! lol

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    Senior Member NancySue's Avatar
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    The only thing I would want is all women in that era wore nylon stockings. I?m waiting for the day for that to happen, but I fear it?s just a pipe dream. Certain fashions have been known to return. Fingers crossed.

  14. #14
    Exploring NEPA now Cheryl T's Avatar
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    Personally I lover those dresses of the flappers.
    Add the boas and the feathered headbands and they are so darn cute. I'd love to have an outfit from that time.

  15. #15
    Gold Member alwayshave's Avatar
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    I do like a flapper dress.
    Please call me Jamie, I always_have crossdressed, I always will, "alwayshave".

  16. #16
    Weirdest woman ever! docrobbysherry's Avatar
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    Well, I'm in my 70's but Sherry's just in her 20's. So, bring on the 20's themed parties!
    U can't keep doing the same things over and over and expect to enjoy life to the max. When u try new things, even if they r out of your comfort zone, u may experience new excitement and growth that u never expected.

    Challenge yourself and pursue your passions! When your life clock runs out, you'll have few or NO REGRETS!

  17. #17
    Senior Member Majella St Gerard's Avatar
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    I do need a new flapper dress, the one I have I bought when I was heavy and is too big on me.

  18. #18
    Reality Check Krisi's Avatar
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    The only thing I would want is all women in that era wore nylon stockings...……..
    Well, that's not true. Not even close. Many women in the 1920s were living on farms, picking cotton and other crops. Others were living in towns and cities but poor as a church mouse and had no money for nylon stockings.

    Movies and TV have glamorized the 1920s but except for the wealthy and socially connected, life was not like that, not even close.

    Never has life been so good in this country as right now in 2020.
    Krisi

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    Flapper dresses YES, The 20's no Just the dresses.
    Rader

  20. #20
    Member Denise C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisi View Post
    Well, that's not true. Not even close. Many women in the 1920s were living on farms, picking cotton and other crops. Others were living in towns and cities but poor as a church mouse and had no money for nylon stockings.

    Movies and TV have glamorized the 1920s but except for the wealthy and socially connected, life was not like that, not even close.

    Never has life been so good in this country as right now in 2020.
    Then considering these to truly being the roaring 2020's and stockings and pantyhose for everyone with their flappers!

  21. #21
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    well you know it's tempting to think that the twenties was all about flappers and gin mills and Scott and Zelda, but I came of age in the sixties which were supposed to be all about sex and drugs and rock and roll. But for me, it was about being a kid growing up in the country and looking forward to "I-Spy" on Wednesday nights and "The Man From Uncle," and waiting for the next Beatles album to drop. So while we get this message that the twenties was this insane decade long party, I think most people were just going to work and trying to make a living.

  22. #22
    Member Marianne S's Avatar
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    There is something to be said for the Roaring 20s. That fashionably flat-chested look with a boyish figure would suit many of us, those who have bodies like that anyway! I might just look good in a "flapper" dress! What fun!

    As for those comments about "rich folks," there was money to be made in the 20s, when the stock market soared. As long as you remembered to sell and cash in before October of 1929, and on all accounts before the 24th ("Black Thursday"). With luck you might just make enough profit to carry you through the Depression. Some people did, often those with long Dutch and German names.

    Aside from those benefits, from today's viewpoint the 1920s certainly had their drawbacks. It wasn't just a lot of people who were poor back then. Cellphone service was extremely poor, just for starters. Movies with no sound, scratchy phonograph records, cars that went like a slug and handled rotten, even if you could afford one, and were dangerous to crash in, which they often did. No flying down the freeway at 90mph the way half of us do here in Phoenix. No freeways to fly down, come to that! In the 1920s it took ages to get anywhere. As for real flying, forget it! If you wanted a transatlantic vacation it meant several days on an ocean liner. And watch the Bay of Biscay; that's the one place in my life I was ever seasick! No transatlantic flights, unless you could hitch a ride with Lindbergh, and that didn't happen until 1927. (All right, I do know about Alcock and Brown back in 1919.) Want to visit Auntie in Australia? No QANTAS! That was several weeks' sea voyage back in the 1920s. Then there was health care, of course. No antibiotics in the 1920s. If you had a weak immune system you might die from a simple staph infection. No heart, kidney or liver transplants. Lots of other things missing too. I have glaucoma, inherited from my mother. About the only treatment back then was pilocarpine. It did some good, but not enough. If I lived in the 1920s I might be nearly blind by now.

    And all those poor women having to pick cotton, as Krisi said. What a tedious job! No wonder they sang songs to relieve the boredom, much as mariners sang sea shanties while they hauled on the halyards and whatnot.

    Gonna jump down, turn around, pick a bale of cotton,
    Gonna jump down, turn around, pick a bale a day.
    Me and my wife can pick a bale of cotton,
    Me and my wife can pick a bale a day...

    Well, I'm glad my (sadly late) wife never had to pick cotton for a living, and earned enough to buy pantyhose!

    I'm sure the 1920s did have some advantages. Apart from gangsterism, there wasn't as much crime as we have now--people didn't lock their doors against burglars as much--and in tougher times I dare say people were more neighborly and helped one another out more. And if travel was slower, a long sea voyage could be relaxing and socially convivial. Not like the rush and stress of flying squashed together in a tin can the way we do today. Even on the road, there was time to read the Burma Shave signs, introduced in 1926.

    However, there was always the problem of intolerance. In any age there are always wretched people trying to ban something or restrict something else. In the 1920s it was alcohol. Today it's everything under the sun, from smoking and vaping all the way to mercury thermometers. Everybody used them back the 1920s. Just try getting a classic clinical mercury thermometer today. You have to order it from China! Maybe that's part of what they mean about Chinese medicine being "traditional."

    However, it's what people are intolerant of that makes all the difference to us as individuals. Maybe if you're teetotal and have a well-paid job that doesn't call for you to pick cotton--as a doctor, for instance, taking patients' temperatures with a traditional mercury thermometer--you wouldn't mind living in the 1920s. But here's what would really kill all the fun. Considering how intolerant of crossdressing people have been, even within some of our own lifetimes, how bad must genderphobia have been a hundred years ago? It might feel delicious to wear a flapper dress--as long as we could pass, and remain undetected. But if we were detected, what would happen then? Genderphobes would probably run us out of town, tarring and feathering us first! Despite the other kinds of intolerance everyone has to put up with today, as crossdressers we're still better off in the 2020s, folks!

  23. #23
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    There were no nylon stockings in the 1920s. Only cotton, linen and silk stockings, like in the move The Danish Girl. Wasn't until the late 1930s nylon stockings were available.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Asew's Avatar
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    Nah, the 20s don't hold much interest for me (glamorous or every day). 1940s and later yes, and some modern takes on 18th century possibly, but for some reason 20s fashion doesn't appeal to me. But I love big band music but most of what I loved is more 1930s than 1920s.

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    One of my neighbors gave me her dress from the 1920s. It has only been worn a few times. I would love to be able to fit it, but she was very petite when she wore it. I keep it just to remember her. She knew I crossdressed and was very supportive of it.

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